Seven In Ten New Hampshire Residents Support Legalizing Marijuana, Poll Shows One Day After House Passes Reform Measure

February 25, 2023 · marijuanamoment.net

New Hampshire residents broadly support legalizing marijuana, according to a new poll that was released one day after the state House of Representatives passed a bill to enact the policy change.

Seventy-one percent of respondents in the survey published by the University of New Hampshire on Thursday said they support “legalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana for personal recreational use”—with 56 percent saying they “strongly” feel that way.

Support transcends party lines, with 86 percent of Democrats, 62 percent of Republicans and 53 percent of independents on board.

Just 18 percent of New Hampshire residents oppose legalization, according to the Granite State Poll.

Support has grown significantly since the university first posed the question in 2013, with only 49 percent saying then that they supported legalization. That said, backing for the reform has dipped a few points in recent years from when 75 percent were in favor in 2021.

The survey involved interviews with 863 New Hampshire residents between February 176-20 and has am margin of error of +/-3.3 percentage points.

Cannabis legalization legislation, which is being sponsored by Majority Leader Jason Osborne (R) and Minority Leader Matthew Wilhelm (D), was approved by the House in a 234-127 vote on Wednesday.

Members of the House Commerce and Consumer Affairs Liquor Subcommittee had spent weeks working the proposal over a series of meetings, going back and forth about a variety of provisions and making amendments to the original measure.

A major change made to the legislation from its introduced form would put the state’s existing Liquor Commission in charge of regulating the marijuana market, rather than create a new independent commission to do so, as was proposed in the original version of HB 639. The body would also be renamed the Liquor and Cannabis Commission.

Advocates are disappointed that provisions allowing home grow and to annul prior cannabis convictions have been removed from the bill as filed, but it was viewed as a necessary compromise for the legislation to have a chance of being enacted this session.

The bill will next head to the House Ways & Means Committee, before heading back to the floor and then potentially going to the Senate for consideration.

Here’s what HB 639 as amended would accomplish:

Adults 21 and older would be able to purchase, possess and gift up to four ounces of cannabis.

The newly renamed Liquor and Cannabis Commission would be responsible for regulating the marijuana market and issuing business licenses.

There would not be any statewide cap on the number of marijuana businesses that could be licensed.

Within 18 months of enactment, the state Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and commission would need to develop regulations allowing existing medical cannabis dispensaries to apply for dual licenses to start serving adult consumers.

Cannabis cultivators would be taxed at 15 percent of their monthly gross revenue.

Eighty percent of tax revenue would support an education trust fund, 10 percent will fund substance misuse treatment programs, five percent would go to localities that have at least one operational retailer and five percent (up to $1 million) would support public agencies like police and fire departments.

Localities could limit or ban marijuana businesses from operating in their area.

There would be employment protections for state or local government workers who use marijuana off the job. Professional and occupational licenses couldn’t be denied or withdrawn because a person uses cannabis.

Marijuana companies could deduct business expenses from their taxes at the state level.

There are no provisions to allow home cultivation or annul prior cannabis convictions.

A separate legalization that’s still being considered, HB 544, sponsored by Rep. Daniel Eaton (D), would create a system where the recreational marijuana market would consist of government-run stores, with the Liquor Commission tasked with regulating and administering the “cultivation, manufacture, testing, and retail sale of cannabis statewide.”

Meanwhile, several other legalization bills have also been filed this session, including barebones proposals to remove cannabis from the state’s controlled substances list and allow non-commercial home cultivation for adults.

HB 344, the non-commercial bill, was retained by the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee on Friday in a 15-5 vote. That means that the panel can act on the bill at some point later this year if it chooses to.

A separate limited home cultivation proposal focused on medical cannabis patients from Rep. Wendy Thomas (D) was scheduled to receive a vote in the House Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Committee last week, but the panel delayed action until next month.

While there’s optimism about the prospects of legalization finally moving in the Granite State this year, advocates still have work cut out for them.

Republicans held on to the both the House and Senate after last year’s election, and the latter chamber is where marijuana reform has faced its toughest obstacles in past sessions even as the House has repeatedly approved legalization bills. The Senate rejected two House-passed reform bills last year, including one that would have created a non-commercial cannabis program and another providing for commerce under a state-run model.

In the Senate, there were some shifts that favor reform, however. For example, a Democratic senator who opposed legalization efforts was replaced by a Republican who voted in favor of ending prohibition during his time as a House member.

Gov. Chris Sununu (R), who was reelected last year, remains opposed to legalization—but his more recent comments on the issue seem to show a softening of his position. He said during a debate last year that reform “could be inevitable,” but he added that states need to “be patient about how you do it.”

After the Senate rejected two reform bills last year, the House included legalization language as an amendment to separate criminal justice-related legislation—but that was also struck down in the opposite chamber.

The non-commercial legalization measure that was defeated had previously passed the House under Democratic control in 2020 but was defeated in the Senate at the committee stage.

Lawmakers also filed separate bills to put marijuana legalization on the state’s 2022 ballot, but the House rejected them. (Full Story)

In categories:Legalization Politics
Next Post

Virginia Lawmakers Send Bill Restricting Hemp Products To Governor

Both chambers of the Virginia General Assembly voted Friday to pass a bill to toughen regulations on hemp-derived products that contain intoxicating THC through a more robust permitting system and stricter labeling rules. Retail marijuana sales will remain illegal under the proposed…
Read
Previous Post

Alaska Supreme Court Orders Marijuana Records To Be Removed From Conviction Database

On May 1, the Alaska Court System will remove the marijuana possession convictions of about 750 Alaskans from Courtview, the state’s online database of court cases. The Alaska Supreme Court announced the move in an order signed January 31 by the court’s…
Read
Random Post

Urbn Leaf Moves Uptown

Los Angeles’s famous Sunset Strip has a storied and often sordid history as the epicenter of sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll in America. The mile-and-a-half-long corridor has embraced its countercultural reputation, and its iconic venues like the Viper Room, the Roxy,…
Read
Random Post

New Jersey Police Officers Plan To Sue After Being Fired Over Marijuana

Four New Jersey police officers are preparing to sue Jersey City after being fired for testing positive for marijuana—despite being protected under the state’s cannabis legalization law and guidance from the state attorney general. The Jersey City officers said that…
Read
Random Post

Delaware Beach Towns Line Up To Ban Recreational Pot in Their Jurisdictions

Recreational cannabis was, at long last, made legal in Delaware earlier this year. But several of the state’s beach towns situated along the eastern seaboard have ridden a different wave, opting instead to maintain the prohibition on weed within their respective…
Read
Random Post

Massachusetts’ Harpoon Brewery Launches its First THC Beverage

Massachusetts-based Harpoon Brewery has launched its first THC-infused beverage, Rec. Weed, in partnership with Novel Beverage Company. Harpoon Brewery has launched its first THC-based beverage, Rec. Weed, in partnership with Novel Beverage Company. The company describes Rec. Weed as “hop-forward…
Read